A Thought Piece by Kim Goode 24 November 2017

After her Mental Health First Aid training, Kim Goode, Learning Assistant at Willenhall E-ACT Academy was inspired to write this poem based on her experience of working with young people.

I am talking but do you hear me? Can you listen to what I say?

I’m telling you what’s going on in my life, today won’t be a good day.

I am talking but do you hear me? Did you hear what I just said?

I am struggling to understand all the thoughts running around in my head.

I am talking but do you hear me? Will you acknowledge how I feel?

I know it may be difficult for you to comprehend, but for me this is real.

I am talking but do you hear me? And all the words that are tumbling out.

I’m starting to get frustrated now, I’m going to start to shout.

Now you have sat and listened to all my worries, thoughts and fears.

Reassured me and comforted me, given me tissues for my tears.

Now you have sat and listened to how life really is for me.

You have put yourself in my shoes and have shown me empathy.

Now you have sat and listened, that hopeless feeling is going away.

You have helped me and given me the tools to carry on with my day.

Now you have sat and that black heavy cloud has gone from my head.

You have put things into perspective, I have listened to what you have said.

I need to do things differently, look at it from a different point of view.

And if I should start feeling down, then I know what I should do.

I need to do things differently. You have given me the tools that I need.

I know it’s not going to be plain sailing but I am determined to succeed.

I need to do things differently, be a bit more positive about life.

Understand no-one lives happily ever after, we all have our troubles and strife.

I need to do things differently, and stop being so hard on myself.

I must put in the time and effort and take care of my mental health.

Following her Mental Health First Aid training, Kim noted:

“Our young people across all academies will benefit greatly from staff who are trained in this, potentially saving lives.”